Gambling Addiction


What is the Buddhist view of gambling?

There are six evil consequences in indulging in gambling:

(i) the winner begets hate,
(ii) the loser grieves for lost wealth,
(iii) loss of wealth,
(iv) his word is not relied upon in a court of law,
(v) he is despised by his friends and associates,
(vi) he is not sought after for matrimony; for people would say he is a gambler and is not fit to look after a wife [spouse]...

Gambling is discouraged by the Buddha, as we can see in the Sigalovada Sutta. What are the six channels for dissipating wealth which Buddha does not pursue?


Gambling rewires brain in a negative way

LAS VEGAS - The excitement and risk-taking of betting can change the brain's chemistry and create compulsive gamblers, a Harvard professor told casino executives Thursday during an American Gaming Association seminar.

"Addictive behaviors rewire the brain," Dr. Howard Shaffer, director of Harvard Medical School's Division on Addictions, told a group of about 100 hotel-casino officials at the Golden Nugget.


The cost of gambling addiction

"From my youth I was immeasurably given to table games; through them I made the acquintance of Francisco Sforza, Duke of Milan, and many friends among the nobles. But through the long years I devoted to them, nearly forty, it is not easy to tell how many of my possessions I have lost without compensation. But the dice treated me even worse, because I instructed my sons in the game and opened my house to gamblers. For this I have only feeble excuses: poor birth and the fact that I was not inept at the game...


My life stopped the first day I started gambling

Woman with gambling addiction admits to casino scam

Shoumin Chai once had a promising future. A law school graduate, she was hired by a New York firm with the promise of a $250,000-a-year job if she passed the bar, her defense attorney said.

Then, she went to Atlantic City with a couple of friends.

"My life stopped the first day I started gambling," Chai said today in Northampton County Court as she admitted to the latest in more than 15 years of casino-related crimes.


Gamblers' $3.5B suit against OLG rejected

OTTAWA (CBC) - Problem gamblers have lost their bid to a launch a $3.5 billion class action lawsuit against the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation.

Sun Mar 21, 12:03 PM

Between December 1999 and February 2005, more than 10,000 people voluntarily signed "self-exclusion" forms, asking the government-owned lottery corporation to bar them from its gaming sites.